Doctors Tweet About Vaccinating Their Children With Covid-19 Vaccines Imminently Available For 12 To 15 Year Olds

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could extend the Emergency Authorization (EUA) for use … [+] of the Pfizer / BioNTech Covid-19 mRNA vaccine for people aged 12 to 15 in the coming week. Here Junior Molly Day gets her first Pfizer / BioNTech Covid vaccine from high school at Ridley High School. “It feels good, I’m glad that I can protect myself and others,” said Day after getting the shot. (Photo by Pete Bannan / MediaNews Group / Daily Times via Getty Images)

MediaNews Group via Getty Images

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could extend the emergency approval (EUA) for the use of the Pfizer / BioNTech Covid-19 mRNA vaccine to people aged 12 to 15 as early as next week. And many doctors on social media have expressed willingness to have their children vaccinated.

For example, a surgeon, Dr. Callie Thompson, Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Utah, gets straight to the point with the following tweet:

Below that tweet was a tweet from Emergency Doctor Elizabeth Koval, MD, about her family being vaccinated during this current Covid-19 pandemic emergency.

And a nephrologist, Joel M. Topf, MD FACP, had no kidneys by tweeted:

Then there was this pulmonologist at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center, Avraham Z. Cooper, MD, who doesn’t seem to be going to stop getting his children vaccinated, not by a lung shot:

As you can see, Cooper felt the tweet from Mark Lewis, MD, an oncologist at Intermountain Health Care, was spot on too.

All of this is remarkable because actions, as they say, speak louder than words. It’s not what you say it’s what you do People’s actions indicate their true feelings. Actions are like a whole body. They tend to reveal what is really going on.

These doctors are likely trying to show that they support words with actions. Presumably they see the protection of their own children as a priority and do not give anything harmful to their children. You don’t see too many parents saying, “Hey family, we’re going to experiment with you today” or “Hey kids, try kicks.” We don’t know if it will do anything. By the way, let me tell you how I met your mother (or father). “No, these doctors seem to understand the scientific value of vaccinating as many people as possible.

In contrast, how many people who sell various dietary supplements and therapies that are not backed by science are willing to use their products and treatments on their own family members?

Pfizer has already applied for an EUA for the 12-15 age group and is expected to apply for an EUA for the 2-11 year olds in September. When it comes to the safety and effectiveness of the Covid-19 vaccine, children don’t seem very different from adults.

Now, some have argued that children are less likely to get poor results when infected with the Covid-19 coronavirus. This may be true, but the risk of poor results is certainly not zero. Data from the American Academy of Pediatrics showed that by December 17, at least 172 children in the United States had died, with about 1.3% of children hospitalized with Covid-19 and 0.01% dying. In addition, children can be super spreaders of the virus. Think about what children can touch and do throughout the day. “Respecting boundaries” may not be the first thing you think of when introducing young children and even teenagers. So if you expect kids to stay six feet or a Denzel (because Denzel Washington is about six feet tall) apart at all times, expect a lot.

Plus, the vaccine isn’t like a gigantic full-body condom made of concrete. It offers good protection, but the protection is not 100%. Even after a full vaccination, you still have a chance of getting Covid-19. It is therefore important that as many people as possible are vaccinated. Your risk of developing Covid-19 depends not only on whether you are fully vaccinated, but also on whether it is also in your area.

When it comes to health issues, many people today may be more likely to listen to political leaders and celebrities without a medical background than to those who have spent much of their lives studying and practicing medicine. Isn’t that like saying, “Hey, you look good in a swimsuit, why don’t you play quarterback for us in the Super Bowl?” Or “Hmm, who can represent us in this important process?” How about whoever takes the best selfies? “Would you really seek medical advice from someone like FOX News host Tucker Carlson, whose lack of a scientific background hasn’t stopped him from giving Covid-19 advice like a Cheez Whiz, as I detailed earlier for Forbes? Instead, if you want good health advice, look for good and conscientious doctors who follow real scientific evidence. And ask not only what to do, but what they would do for themselves and their own families.

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